Three Students Selected for 2017 Mapworks Scholarship

By: The Skyfactor Mapworks Team | Aug 22 2017

The Mapworks Scholarship is a national scholarship program for first and second-year college students who have participated in the Mapworks program. Skyfactor created these scholarships to highlight the experiences and achievements of Mapworks students. The scholarships are intended to help students reduce the cost of their college educations and assist them in progressing toward graduation.

This year, Skyfactor encouraged eligible students to submit a 1-3 minute video outlining the creative, personal ways Mapworks has made a difference in their college career thus far. In 2017, out of an impressive pool of testimonials, Skyfactor selected 3 Mapworks Scholarship winners.

Skyfactor is proud to announce Danee’ Allen from Salem State University, Mikayla Kia from Humboldt State University, and Zohal Mohammady from Pacific Lutheran University were all awarded a Mapworks Scholarship in the amount of $1,500 for the 2017/18 year.

Mapworks Scholarship Recips Header 2017

Mapworks Scholarship Recipients Tell Their Stories

Says Mohammady, “Mapworks was like a personal guidance counselor to me, except I was my own counselor … it really was my own personal map. After (taking the Mapworks survey) I started asking myself questions like, “What can I improve upon? What should I do from here? What am I doing right or wrong?” Mapworks has certainly helped me answer these questions and helped me adjust to my own situation. There’s no denying that Mapworks has impacted my life and character.”

For her part, Allen gives a glimpse into the life and struggles of a new college student. “The part that was most beneficial to me in the 2016 and 2017 surveys that I filled out were the strengths and weaknesses portions,” says Allen. “In the 2016 survey report, I noticed that time management was a big weakness for me. I guess it’s because I started a job early on in the semester, so I never really had time to settle in and take the time to enjoy campus life. My job consisted of an hour long drive to and from work, which took up a lot of my time that I could have been using to do assignments or socialize on campus. The second weakness that I had was academic self-confidence. Procrastination was a huge challenge for me because I had a lot going on and I was in a new environment, so I didn’t necessarily know how to plan out everything for each day. My last weakness was financial confidence, simply because college is very expensive, and I have two other siblings back home in Connecticut who my parents have to tend to and care for.”

By the spring semester, according to Allen, things had begun to turn around, in no small part because of the effort she put into improving her targeted weaknesses. “My time management and academic self-confidence both turned into strengths for me. I made a plan and decided to get a job closer to campus. Although I’ve improved in those two areas, financial confidence is still a struggle.”

After all this, Allen echoes Mohammady’s conclusion. “Overall, these surveys have taught me a lot about myself—what I can and can’t handle—considering I’m a full-time student with a job and part of four different organizations here on campus. I am working hard to stay on top of things and it’s going good for me so far.”

And Kia has her own successes to share. She too struggled with time management and financial confidence. After balancing her work schedule, studies, and social life, she took to the hard work of tackling her financial confidence. “Next year, I’ve been given the opportunity to become a residential assistant, receiving free meals and free housing. With this job, I have become much more financially confident, as my costs for school next year have been basically cut in half. I still have a lot to pay to stay in school, but I’m not as scared as I was at the beginning of this year.”

“If these aspects of my life hadn’t been addressed as weaknesses,” she says, “I don’t know if I would have been so eager to improve on them.”